Economic Depression
Economic Depression

David Stockman explains why an economic collapse is all but inevitable:

You can’t live beyond your means because it’s pleasant. It’s not sustainable. Clearly the level of debt that we have is not sustainable. We have a whole generation – the Baby Boom – that’s about ready to retire, and they have no retirement savings. We have a federal government that is bankrupt, literally. Its [debt is] $16 trillion and growing by a trillion a year. Something’s going to give. We can’t pay for all these entitlements. There won’t be the revenue generation in the economy to do it.

So as a result of that, we are deluding ourselves if we think we can just continue to spend.

 

Austerity isn’t an elective course. Austerity is something that happens to you when you’re broke. And yes, it is painful and spending will go down and unemployment will go up and incomes will be impaired, but that is a consequence of the excess debt creation that we’ve had for the last thirty years. So austerity is what happens when you break the rules.

And somehow we have this debate going on. They’re making a mistake. They chose the wrong strategy. Do you think Greece chose the wrong strategy with austerity? No. No one would lend them money. That’s why they ended up in the place they were. Do you think that Spain today is teetering on the brink because they said, “Oh, wouldn’t it be a good idea to have austerity?” No, they had a gun to their head. They were forced to do this because the markets would not continue to lend, and even now their interest rate is again rising. The markets are losing confidence, and unless the ECB prints some more money and bails them out some more, they are going to have austerity. So the austerity upon us is the backside of the debt supercycle we had for the past thirty years. It’s not discretionary.

 

The Fed has destroyed the money market. It has destroyed the capital markets. They have something that you can see on the screen called an “interest rate.” That isn’t a market price of money or a market price of five-year debt capital. That is an administered price that the Fed has set and that every trader watches by the minute to make sure that he’s still in a positive spread. And you can’t have capitalism if the capital markets are dead, if the capital markets are simply a branch office – branch casino – of the central bank. That’s essentially what we have today.

 

I would stay out of any security markets. These are unsafe markets at any speed. It’s all tied together. As I was saying when the great margin call comes and they start selling the Treasury bond, they’ll take everything else with it. Real estate is priced off Treasuries. Mortgaged-backed securities are priced off Treasuries. Corporates are priced off Treasuries. Junk bonds are priced off Treasuries. Everything. The stock market will go into a panic. We don’t know when the timing will come – we’ve never been in a world where there is $15 trillion worth of central-bank balance sheets, like we have today. The only thing I think you can conclude is preservation is the only thing you are about as an investor. Forget about yield. Forget about return. Just keep yourself liquid and preserve your capital, because you can’t predict the day when, as I say, the great margin call in the sky comes down.

 

When the financial markets reprice drastically, it’s going to have a shocking effect on economic activity. It’s going to paralyze things. It’s going to finally cause consumption to come down. It’s going to cause government spending to be retracted.

You know, the Keynesians are right. Borrowing does add to GDP accounts. But it doesn’t add to wealth. It doesn’t add to real productivity, but it does add to GDP as it’s calculated and published – because GDP accounts were designed by Keynesians who don’t believe in a balance sheet. So they said, “If the public sector and the household sector are borrowing, let’s say, $10 trillion next year, run it though GDP, you’ll get a big bump to GDP.” But sooner or later your balance sheet will collapse. They forgot about that one. So my point is that we’ve gone through a thirty-year expansion of the balance sheet, an artificial growth in GDP; now we’re going to have to be retracting the collective balance sheets. That means that GDP will not grow. It may even contract, and no one’s prepared for that.

Hat tip John Dinkum Wagner. Watch the video here

John also highlighted a reader comment:

Every major country in the world, except China, is unable to pay its bills without going deeper into debt. All while interest rates are at dead nuts lows. Low interest rates should only be earned on the safest of plays, but loaning to a broke country is clearly not a safe play. Once broke, a default can occur at any time, or it can be delayed until hyperinflation. That’s it. And once the whirlwind effect of inflation pushing up interest rates starts, the existence of the major currencies of the world, except the Chinese Yuan, will be measured in months.

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